Donate to support the Black Lives Matter movement

 Donate to support the Black Lives Matter movement

Donate to support the Black Lives Matter movement
 Donate to support the Black Lives Matter movement


Many teachers, parents and students across the country may feel the same way, as they returned to school this fall. As the school year ended and summer began, i explained the story after story that black lives in this community don't matter. In late May, a white supremacist stabbed University of Maryland student Richard Collins III at a bus stop on campus a few days before he graduated. A few weeks later, in Portland, two girls in high school after school on a train were targeted by a white fanatic who put a knife on three adults involved, killing two. 

In Seattle, police shot Charina Lyles, a public school mother, who is pregnant and a mother of four, after asking them for help. At the end of the summer, white supremacists apparently descended on the University of Virginia campus to protest the removal of a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee. The next day, a large number of opposition protesters gathered, and these extreme right-wing racists responded with violence.

 Several protesters beat opposition protesters, Deandre Harris, who worked as an educational assistant in a private classroom, while another drove a car toward anti-racist protesters, killing 32-year-old Heather Heyer and injuring a dozen others. These extreme right-wing racists responded with violence. Several protesters beat anti-Protester DeAndre Harris , who worked as an educational assistant in a private classroom, while another drove a car toward anti-racist protesters, killing 32-year-old Heather Heyer and injuring a dozen others. These extreme right-wing racists responded with violence. Several protesters beat opposition protesters, Deandre Harris, who worked as an educational assistant in a private classroom, while another drove a car toward anti-racist protesters, killing 32-year-old Heather Heyer and injuring a dozen others.


The Trump administration's racist rhetoric allowed white and superior police to escalate their attacks against blacks and other communities of color. As a result, many students across the country are likely to return to the classroom this fall, carrying the pain and confusion of the racist summer events.


Unfortunately, from curricula to discipline policies, many schools promote racist messages and systematic disrespect for black lives. From a Connecticut textbook that said slave owners treat slaves as "family members," to a black girl in South Carolina thrown across the room by a school cop for refusing to store her cell phone, to two young women in Boston who were kicked out of their sports teams, banned from a concert, detained for wearing braided hair, and students often been more traumatized by an education system that reproduces inequality in society.


Meanwhile, millionaires and billionaires who are leading the corporate school reform movement say discipline "without excuses" and preparing for the endless test will close the performance gap between white and black students. However, these reforms have not led black students to make any tangible progress. In fact, this system of testing and punishment forced the closure and privatization of public schools in black communities.


Instead, we need to demand investment in the schools and communities they serve, along with anti-racist and pro-justice curricula and teaching methods.


If the abuse of our public schools by corporate reformers is not enough, the New Jersey State Council passed a bill in the summer requiring schools to teach children how to interact with the police "in a mutually mutually beneficial manner." Similar to the way the level test blames students and teachers for the problems facing public schools, this new law sets a dangerous precedent for those who will be responsible for deadly confrontations with the police. Instead of making any effort to hold the police accountable for the systematic killing of blacks and blacks across the country, New Jersey lawmakers chose to blame children and their teachers for not "properly interacting" with the police.


Demonstrators gather across the country following the deaths of George Floyd, Tony McDade, Priona Taylor and others. Now, many wonder how they can support the Black Lives Matter movement. In addition to learning more about racism, engaging in difficult conversations, voting, donating to organizations that directly help individuals and communities are one way to show support.


After receiving donations last week, some nonprofit organizations -- such as minnesota freedom fund and Reclaim the Block, are asking Brooklyn Bail Fund for those who want to donate to redirect their contributions to other organizations. Here are some of the funds and organizations you can still donate to right now.


The Black Lives Matter movement is important.

The Black Lives Matter Movement (BLM) is a "Build the Power for Justice, Healing and Freedom for Blacks Around the World."


The government's ability to address the crisis has been

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) provides legal services and support to those with a wide range of civil rights complaints, from freedom of expression to voting rights. The ACLU works to "preserve constitutionally guaranteed rights and extend them to people who have historically been denied their rights on the basis of race." Donate here.


NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund

The NAACP Education and Legal Defense Fund (LDF) is america's largest law firm fighting for racial justice. "Through litigation, advocacy, and public education, LDF seeks structural changes to expand democracy, eliminate differences, and achieve racial justice in a society that fulfills the promise of equality for all Americans."


George Floyd Memorial Fund

In the five days since George Floyd's brother, Filonis Floyd, launched the Family GoFundMe campaign, more than $8 million has been donated to cover funeral and burial expenses, psychological counseling and grief, stay during court proceedings, and to help support his children. Donate on the GoFundMe page.


Black Vision Group

The Black Vision Group is creating campaigns that seek to expand the power of black people and communities in the Twin Cities region. Donate money to the cause here, follow them on Instagram, and you can also register to volunteer or host a workshop.


Bail project

The bail project, which ends mass incarceration, seeks to end racial and economic disparities in the bail system and helps pay bail for those who cannot afford it. Since its inception in 2007, WHO has paid bail to more than 10,000 people, including 1,329 during the COVID-19 pandemic. You can also find a complete guide to bail funds by state here.



The government's policy of "supporting the government of the people of The Sa'a

By bringing together teams of scientists, policymakers, journalists and advocates, the Center for Research and Anti-Racism Policy, run by Dr. Abram X, operates. They have recently worked on COVID Racial Data Tracker, which collects and analyzes ethnic data on the COVID-19 pandemic, which has so far disproportionately affected communities of color